Marvel announces projects celebrating Indigenous history

‘Marvel’s Voices: Indigenous Voices’ will feature Indigenous talent making their Marvel Comics’ debut.

November is National Native American History Month here in the United States, and Marvel has announced two projects that “celebrate Indigenous history.”

The first, Marvel’s Voices: Indigenous Voices #1, is an anthology of stories by Jeffrey Veregge, Rebecca Roanhorse, Weshoyot Alvitre, Darcie Little Badger, Kyle Charles, Stephen Graham Jones and David Cutler, telling stories featuring Dani ‘Mirage’ Moonstar, Echo and more.

“C.B. [Cebulski] and I started talking about various Native projects a year ago when discussing my ‘Of God’s & Heroes’ Marvel art exhibit at the Smithsonian. I am truly grateful for the platform that Marvel has not only provided for me and my work, but with this edition of Marvel Voices, all of Native America,” Veregge said. “This is an opportunity to share the cultural influences that we as Native artists and writers grew up with that will add more depth and dimension to the Native Heroes in the Marvel Universe.”

The second is a series of variant covers by Veregge, featuring Iron Man, Hulk, Spider-Man, Dani Moonstar and others. You can find them on:

  • Marvel’s Voices: Indigenous Voices #1 “Dani Moonstar Native American Tribute” Variant Cover by Jeffrey Veregge
  • Amazing Spider-Man #52 “Spider-Man Native American Tribute” Variant Cover by Jeffrey Veregge
  • Avengers #38 “Black Panther Native American Tribute” Variant Cover by Jeffrey Veregge
  • Captain America #25 “Captain America Native American Tribute” Variant Cover by Jeffrey Veregge
  • Immortal Hulk #40 “Hulk Native American Tribute” Variant Cover by Jeffrey Veregge
  • Iron Man #3 “Iron Man Native American Tribute” Variant Cover by Jeffrey Veregge
  • Thor #9 “Thor Native American Tribute” Variant Cover by Jeffrey Veregge By Jeffrey Veregge
  • Widowmakers: Red Guardian and Yelena Belova #1 “Black Widow Native American Tribute” Variant Cover by Jeffrey Veregge

“The story of the hero is an ancient one. Starting with the very first cave drawings, artists and writers from across the globe have both captured and shared the fateful acts of their people’s heroes. Being from the Pacific Northwest, my own people, the S’Klallam Tribe, have used the art style known as Formline to record and share the stories of our people since time immemorial. The art style I use in my own work today is an extension of the same shapes and forms used for hundreds of years by Native artists from and around the very same region,” Veregge said. “As a lifelong comic fan, artist and Native American, I am truly honored to work with Marvel Comics today. Not only to create pieces that represent a voice for Indigenous People in honor of Native American Heritage month, but also for the opportunity to share the same storytelling spirit of my ancestors by sharing the tales of some of today’s heroes.”

Check out Veregge’s variants below, and you can see more of his Marvel-inspired art on the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian website:

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