The Grumpy Color | Tom and Carla retire 2015, Part 1

Smash Pages contributors Tom Bondurant and Carla Hoffman continue their end-of-year tradition, looking back at the year in Big Two superhero comics and looking forward to 2016.

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World’s Smashiest

[Smash Pages contributors Tom Bondurant and Carla Hoffman continue their end-of-year tradition, looking back at the year in Big Two superhero comics and looking forward to 2016.]

Carla Hoffman: Time to get off the couch, put down the Ben and Jerry’s and stop listening to Moonlight Sonata on repeat, it’s the end of the year! Marvel and DC have cast their nets wide through event books, new titles, TV shows and movies to reel in new readers, viewers and mass market appeal and somebody’s has to sort through it all, sir! For somebody, read: us.

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Valiant teases 2016 slate: Bloodshot Island, new Archer & Armstrong, more

Get a glimpse of what the future holds for Ninjak, Divinity and more.

With 2015 winding down, Valiant Entertainment has released several teasers for upcoming storylines and returning titles from the publisher. Of note: Jeff Lemire, Mico Suayan and David Baron journey to “Bloodshot Island,” while Matt Kindt and Diego Bernard plan a siege for Ninjak. And oh yeah, Archer and Armstrong return! I’m really looking forward to seeing what Rafer Roberts does on the title.

Check out all the teasers below …

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ninjak

‘Crisis’ at 30, Part 12

“Someday this war’s going to end,” laments Robert Duvall’s Col. Kilgore to conclude his memorable joyride through 1979’s Apocalypse Now. Similarly, as we come to the final issue of Crisis On Infinite Earths, I find myself longing (just a little) for more panels overstuffed with characters, more conversationally-expository dialogue, and even more stakes-raising plot twists.

Still, Crisis had to end sometime. Last issue introduced the singular timeline and its history. It was the first step into an era that continues to inform DC’s superhero comics. As such, issue #12 — which appeared in comics shops some thirty years ago, during the first week of November 1985 — is about cleaning up the miniseries’ last bits of clutter and getting the merged timeline ready for all its prospective readers. It’s 42 pages of wall-to-wall action, executed skillfully by the creative team.

Dogpile
Dogpile

“Someday this war’s going to end,” laments Robert Duvall’s Col. Kilgore to conclude his memorable joyride through 1979’s Apocalypse Now. Similarly, as we come to the final issue of Crisis On Infinite Earths, I find myself longing (just a little) for more panels overstuffed with characters, more conversationally-expository dialogue, and even more stakes-raising plot twists.

Still, Crisis had to end sometime. Last issue introduced the singular timeline and its history. It was the first step into an era that continues to inform DC’s superhero comics. As such, issue #12 — which appeared in comics shops some thirty years ago, during the first week of November 1985 — is about cleaning up the miniseries’ last bits of clutter and getting the merged timeline ready for all its prospective readers. It’s 42 pages of wall-to-wall action, executed skillfully by the creative team.

Speaking of which, credits: Crisis On Infinite Earths issue 12 was co-plotted, scripted, and edited by Marv Wolfman, co-plotted and pencilled by George Pérez, inked by Jerry Ordway (who also pencilled one page), colored by Tom Ziuko, and lettered by John Costanza. Robert Greenberger was the associate editor and Len Wein was the consulting editor.

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Continue reading “‘Crisis’ at 30, Part 12”

‘Nowhere Men’ returns with new artist Dave Taylor

Taylor takes over as artist from Nate Bellegrade with issue #7, which arrives in January.

Nowhere Men, the “scientists-as-rock-stars” comic by Image co-publisher Eric Stephenson, artist Nate Bellegrade and Einser award-winning colorist Jordie Bellaire, will return in January with a new artist, Dave Taylor (Batman: Death by Design, Judge Dredd, Prophet).

“It’s very cool to work on something you admire,” Taylor said in the press release. “My respect for the first series is making me work extra hard to fulfil Eric’s concept to the end, in fact, this is the best work I’ve done for years.”

Issue #7 picks up after the cliffhanger that issue #6 left us with two years ago. “It’s really exciting to finally be returning to Nowhere Men,” Stephenson said in the press release. “I’ve admired Dave’s work since I first saw it back in the ‘90s, so learning that he was a fan of of Nowhere Men and interested in working on the book was nothing short of amazing. It’s awesome to be working with him, and I’m looking forward to seeing how his style develops as we further explore the landscape created by World Corp.”

The comic tells the story of a Beatle-esque group of scientists — Dade Ellis, Simon Grimshaw, Emerson Strange and Thomas Walker — as they rise in fame and subsequently fall pretty hard when their experiments take some dark and ghastly turns.

The change in artist comes as no surprise, as Bellegrade, who received an Eisner nomination for his work on the book, release two long essays on the comics’ delays and why he wouldn’t be continuing with the series this past summer (available here and here). In that second post, he noted:

To be very honest I would have to admit that I am to some degree angry in a very general and radiant sense. Reason would show that the only person I could be angry about in this situation is myself. It wouldn’t be reasonable to be angry with Eric for not continuing to wait for something he had no guarantee of ever occurring. It wouldn’t be reasonable to be angry with Jordie or Steven for taking his side either. I am angry and therefore I can only be angry at myself because I have unknowingly manufactured this outcome. I am angry because for the past five years the bulk of world-building and character design has been for story elements that have not yet come to pass and now they never will. Ideas for devices and architecture and fashion and cultural landmarks that have so far only existed in my head, stored for future use. Sketches for covers that will never see print, diagrams of Dr. Kurt McManus’ new physiology, drawings of paintings made by Daniel Pierce’s much older sister. I used to know what was going to happen to Dr. Susan Queen, but now I do not. The worldline where those things happen has closed off, the future where they were part of the story winked away into nothing, they were not destroyed but never occurred in the first place. So I am angry that, through my actions, the years of creative euphoria and collaboration where I felt anything was possible were torn away from meaning and crushed into nothing.

Bellegrade is a hell of an artist and left some big shoes for Taylor to fill on the title; best of luck to him as he moves on to his next project.

You can chekc out the covers for issues #7 and 8 below.

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Zander Cannon’s ‘Kaijumax’ returns for second season next May

Trade paperback collecting season one arrives in February for $9.99.

Oni Press has announced that Kaijumax, Zander Cannon’s excellent giant monster/prison mash-up comic, will return next May for a second season. In addition, the first season will arrive in trade paperback in February, for the low introductory price of $9.99.

“You like monsters? YEAH! You like prison? MAYBE! C’mon in and join me for Kaijumax Season 2; the first trade is big yet cheap so people can jump aboard, and I will try not to brutalize or kill off any beloved characters this season. No promises,” Cannon said in the press release.

Kaijumax, which probably shares more in common with Oz or Orange is the New Black than it does a Godzilla movie, features a prison for giant monsters that’s made up of all sorts of interesting characters, from the various monster inmates to the guards who keep an eye on them. Its large cast includes some of the most inventive characters we’ve seen in a long time, both visually and personality wise, and it mashes together genres to create something that embraces the silliness and seriousness of both. If you haven’t checked it out, the priced-to-move trade may be up your alley.

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Landis & friends look back at Superman’s ‘important junctures’ in ‘American Alien’

Check out a preview of the first issue, featuring artwork by Nick Dragotta.

Hollywood screenwriter and Eisner nominee Max Landis (Chronicle, American Ultra) returns to comics in November with a murderer’s row of artists for Superman: American Alien, a seven-issue miniseries that highlights “important junctures in his development as a person.” Each issue features a different artist working with Landis on done-in-one stories set in Clark Kent’s past.

“Issue one is heartwarming, two is brutal, three is sexy, four will make you think, five’s thrilling, six might make you cry and seven … seven has the most violent fight you’ve ever seen featuring Clark Kent,” Landis said in a press release. “This has been my dream since I was 10 years old. Come on this journey with me and Clark. C’mon.”

Nick Dragotta provides art for the first issue, with later issues drawn by Francis Manapul, Jock, Jae Lee, Tommy Lee Edwards, Joëlle Jones and Jonathan Case. Ryan Sook provides the covers. Landis previously worked with Jock on “The Sound of One Hand Clapping,” a story in the digital-first Adventures of Superman #41-42 that received an Eisner nomination for “Best Short Story” last year.

Check out a preview of the first issue below, which comes out Nov. 11.

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